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10/05/2021

Big Garden Birdwatch 2008- Lets do it in the Cotswolds

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Saturday 26th January & Sunday 27th January 2008 – organised by RSPB

The Big Garden Birdwatch is the world’s biggest bird survey. It is organised by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) and has been a regular event since 1979 when they asked their junior membership to count the birds in their garden – over the same weekend. In 2001 the event was officially opened up to everyone and more than 55,000 people took part. In 2007 more than 400,000 participants took part by counting the birds in their garden for an hour. Together they spotted 6 million birds across 236,000 gardens.

With so many people taking part the RSPB are able to gather imprtant data which helps them to understand more about the population trends of UK garden birds.

Over the years the survey has recorded the huge declines in some of our most familiar birds. Since 1979 the number of house sparrows counted has fallen by 52%, the number of starlings by 76% and the number of blackbirds by 44%. However chaffinchs and great tits have both seen their numbers increase by 36% and 52% respectively. 

Take part in the Big Garden Birdwatch 2008 on 26th & 27th January. Simply spend an hour counting the birds in your garden or local park on either day.

Full details of how to take part are explained on the RSPB website www.rspb.org.uk/birdwatch and you can download a counting sheet to help you keep track of how many birds you’ve seen. You submit your results online using an online form which will be open from 26th January for you to enter your counts. The results will be published by the RSPB in March 2008.

Go on – give it a go – it only takes an hour!

Source – Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB)

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