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10/05/2021

Championship Cheese in Broadway

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Gorsehill Abbey St Oswald Cheese is a Supreme Champion

Michael and Diane Stacey of Gorsehill Abbey Farm near Broadway took the Supreme Champion at the Three Counties Cheese and Dairy Produce Competition with their St Oswald cheese. St Oswald is a small rind washed cheese which becomes richer, stronger and more aromatic as it ages. It is named after Oswald, Bishop of Worcester and later Archbishop of York, who is buried at Worcester and is one of their patron saints.

The Three Counties Show was held at Malvern Worcestershire in Mid June and the brand new Cheese & Dairy Produce Show was open to producers resident in Herefordshire,Worcestershire and Gloucestershire. Warners Budgens sponsered this new show and as Supreme Champion the St Oswald cheese will be on sale in their Broadway, Bidford upon Avon and Moreton in Marsh stores for at least two months.

Gorsehill Abbey Cheese produce a range of Fresh and Ripened Cheeses which are available from the farm most of the time or at a number of local shops and Farmers Markets.

www.gorsehillabbey.co.uk

Gorsehill Abbey Farm has been registered organic for over ten years although it has been managed to organic standards for much longer. Michael and Diane have been farming here for over thirty years but have only made cheese commercially since 2003.

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