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10/05/2021

Medieval monarch talks to take place in Stow

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The life and legend of controversial English monarch King Edward II will be the subject of a series of afternoon lectures in Stow in the Wold next month.

Local historian Tim Porter will visit Stow Library, in St Edwards Hall, The Square, for a trio of talks in February, under the banner of ‘The Life and Times of ’. The three talks will provide a fascinating glimpse into the world of the strangest, most contrary and controversial ruler that England has ever produced

Edward II was the first English prince to hold the title ‘Prince of Wales’ after being born at Caernarfon Castle in 1284, and after succeeding his father Edward I in 1308, he pursued a military campaign against the Scots. He was ultimately defeated at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 and later died at Gloucestershire’s Berkeley Castle in 1327. His tomb can be found at Gloucester Cathedral.

The first lecture, ‘Young Edward and his Father’ takes place on Monday February 4th, while the second talk, ‘The King’s Friends and Foes’, is held on Monday February 11th. The final lecture in the series is called ‘Tyranny and Downfall’ and is hosted on Monday February 18th. All three lectures run from 2pm-4pm.

Tickets cost £6.50 per talk, with a 10% discount for annual season ticket holders and Friends of the Corinium Museum. Booking is essential.

For more details or to book, please contact Stow-on-the-Wold Library, St Edwards Hall, Stow-on-the-Wold, on 01451 830352.

Source: Cotswold District Council

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