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10/05/2021

New wardens urge Cotswolds to tree-cycle

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Caroline Ballinger and Claire Blizzard are dreaming of a clean, green Christmas.

Cotswold District Council’s two new Environmental Wardens are urging householders to recycle as much of their waste as possible over the festive period – including their real Christmas trees.

The Council has joined forces with Dobbies Garden Centre at Siddington, near Cirencester, and Fosseway Garden Centre, Moreton-in-Marsh, to set up collection points for trees which will then be shredded and turned into compost.

Householders can also chop their trees into sections and put them in their green garden waste wheeled bins or take them to the Household Recycling Centres at Fosse Cross and Horsley.

“We all love Christmas but it’s traditionally a time of year when we all produce much more waste than usual,” said Caroline

“Hopefully, the residents of the Cotswolds will make a resolution to recycle more than ever this Christmas – including their trees.”

Caroline and Claire took up their new jobs at the start of December. They have been given a wide variety of tasks, from advising the public on waste and recycling issues to investigating environmental offences such as fly-tipping, dog fouling and littering.

“The Cotswolds is a beautiful area and most people are keen to help us keep it that way,” said Claire

“We are both really looking forward to working with residents to ensure that the District is kept as clean and green as possible.”

Real Christmas trees can be recycled at Dobbies and Fosseway Garden Centres until Sunday, 13th January, 2008. After that date they can still be put in green garden waste wheeled bins or taken to Household Recycling Centres.

For details of waste and recycling collections in the Cotswold District over Christmas and New Year, visit www.cotswold.gov.uk or call 01285 623123.

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